Calc Function

  • Diagnosis
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    Diabetes Care in the Hospital(beta)

    Based on guidelines from the American Diabetes Association.

    Standards of Medical Care

    Hospital Care Delivery Standards

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    Level 2

    Physician Order Entry

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    Clinical principle

    Diabetes Care Providers in the Hospital

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    Clinical principle

    Glycemic Targets in Hospitalized Patients

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    Level 1

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    Level 3

    Antihyperglycemic Agents in Hospitalized Patients

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    Level 1

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    Level 1

    Hypoglycemia

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    Clinical principle

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    Level 3

    Transition from the Acute Care Setting

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    Level 2

    How much evidence supports it?

    Level 1
    Clear evidence from well-conducted, generalizable randomized controlled trials that are adequately powered, including evidence from a well-conducted multicenter trial or evidence from a meta-analysis that incorporated quality ratings in the analysis; compelling nonexperimental evidence, i.e., “all or none” rule developed by the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine at the University of Oxford; supportive evidence from well-conducted randomized controlled trials that are adequately powered, including evidence from a well-conducted trial at one or more institutions or evidence from a meta-analysis that incorporated quality ratings in the analysis.
    Level 2
    Supportive evidence from well-conducted cohort studies: evidence from a well-conducted prospective cohort study or registry or evidence from a well-conducted meta-analysis of cohort studies; supportive evidence from a well-conducted case-control study.
    Level 3
    Supportive evidence from poorly controlled or uncontrolled studies: evidence from randomized clinical trials with one or more major or three or more minor methodological flaws that could invalidate the results or evidence from observational studies with high potential for bias (such as case series with comparison with historical controls); evidence from case series or case reports; conflicting evidence with the weight of evidence supporting the recommendation.
    Clinical principle
    Expert consensus or clinical experience.