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    MDRD GFR Equation

    Estimates glomerular filtration rate based on creatinine and patient characteristics.
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    INSTRUCTIONS

    Only for chronic kidney disease (CKD); not accurate for acute renal failure. Also, note that a later study indicates the MDRD may underestimate the actual GFR in healthy patients by up to 29%. This calculator uses the 4-variable equation from Levey 2006, as it has been recalibrated for differences in the lab testing of creatinine.

    Pearls/Pitfalls
    The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study (MDRD) equation cannot be used for acute renal failure. It is only useful in estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in stable chronic kidney disease.
    Female
    Male
    No
    Yes
    years
    mg/dL

    Result:

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    Evidence
    Creator Insights

    Advice

    Always consider and avoid nephrotoxic medications; patients with worsening GFR/CKD may require nephrology consultation.

    Formula

    GFR = 186 × Serum Cr-1.154 × age-0.203 × 1.212 (if patient is black) × 0.742 (if female)

    Use serum Cr in mg/dL for this formula.

    Note: the original MDRD study equation uses a constant of 186, which the authors later revised to 175 to accommodate for standardization of creatinine assays over IDMS. The evidence doesn't seem to strongly suggest that the revised version is demonstrably better than the original (furthermore, the same authors of MDRD also developed the newer CKD-EPI equations, which do seem to be more accurate than either of the MDRD equations).

    Dr. Andrew S. Levey

    About the Creator

    Andrew S. Levey, MD, is the chief of the nephrology division at Tufts Medical Center and the Dr. Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine. His clinical interests include chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetic kidney disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Dr. Levey’s research focuses on laboratory measures to estimate kidney function, new therapies, and the development of clinical practice guidelines for CKD.

    To view Dr. Andrew S. Levey's publications, visit PubMed