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    Patent Pending

    Sodium Correction for Hyperglycemia

    Calculates the actual sodium level in patients with hyperglycemia.
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    Pearls/Pitfalls

    Hyperglycemia causes osmotic shifts of water from the intracellular to the extracellular space, causing a relative dilutional hyponatremia. The classic correction factor of 1.6 mEq/L for every 100 mg/dL increase in serum glucose was challenged by a paper by Hillier et al in 1999, and sometimes their factor of 2.4 mEq/L is used.

    mEq/L
    mg/dL

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    Next Steps
    Evidence
    Creator Insights

    Advice

    Act on the corrected sodium level, not the measured sodium level.

    Formula

    Corrected Sodium (Katz, 1973) = Measured sodium + 0.016 * (Serum glucose - 100)

    Corrected Sodium (Hillier, 1999) = Measured sodium + 0.024 * (Serum glucose - 100)

    Facts & Figures

    Hillier et. al (1999) evaluated 6 healthy subjects, induced hyperglycemia, and measured actual serum sodium levels, finding a sodium correction factor of 2.4mEq/L to be more accurate than the classically taught 1.6mEq/L correction factor from Katz, 1973.

    Dr. Theresa A. Hillier

    About the Creator

    Theresa A. Hillier, MD, MS, is a practicing endocrinologist and senior investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research. Her research includes how modifiable risk factors earlier in life can affect future risk of endocrine diseases, including gestational diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and osteoporosis. Dr. Hillier is currently the principal investigator of the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF),

    To view Dr. Theresa A. Hillier's publications, visit PubMed